Passenger by Alexandra Bracken

 

20983362

 

Science Fiction, Young Adult

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Passenger, the first part in a duology, is a story about time-travel. This is the first YA time-travel novel that I have read and I fell in love with it. The book started out slow, but once I got into the story, it was totally captivating!

Henrietta (Etta) Spencer–the heroine of the story, who is a 17-year-old violin prodigy residing in present-day New York city–belongs to a family of time travelers. During her soft debut, she is involuntarily thrown into the 18th century (sound being a passage in time opening), where she lands up on a prize ship. Privateer Nicholas (Nick) Carter–another time traveler from the powerful Ironwood family (or rather the bastard son of an Ironwood and an Ironwood slave) and the hero of the story–captures a prize ship, the same ship Etta is on. Nick has been told to deliver Etta to Cyprus Ironwood–the vicious patriarch of the Ironwood family, which is the most powerful family among the four families who have the ability to time travel. Etta’s mom is being held hostage by Cyprus until Etta can find a powerful artifact her mother has hidden. Nick feels guilty for bringing Etta to the Ironwood patriarch and accompanies her on her adventure to find the artifact. The book ends on a cliffhanger in typical Bracken fashion.

I love the way Bracken has described the places!–made me feel as if I was actually there. I like the way Etta handles the situation she has been thrust into. Nick and Etta are an interracial couple and it has been addressed beautifully in the book. They understand that being together is not an option in the 1700s, though Etta, being from the 21st century, has no interracial barriers and she tries to allay Nick’s fears.  The historical aspect of the story makes it all the more interesting. For me this was an absolutely amazing read, and the only reason it didn’t get five “quills” is because of the slow beginning.

P.S. “Don’t judge a book by its cover” doesn’t apply for such a gorgeous cover, does it? The cover itself got one “quill” from me!

I’ll be posting the review for “Wayfarer”–part two in the duology–next week, so do follow my site to know the moment I hit publish.

 

 

 

 

 

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